Crusaders and Hurricanes head to court over ticket company collapse

Credit: Original article can be found here

A sign outside the former Ticket Rocket headquarters in Dunedin.

Hamish McNeilly/Stuff

A sign outside the former Ticket Rocket headquarters in Dunedin.

Two rugby franchises are heading to court as they seek to recover money owed by Ticket Rocket.

Lawyers acting for the Crusaders and Hurricanes will appear in the High Court at Dunedin later this month.

The Super rugby franchises are separate plaintiffs in a case against Ticket Rocket, formerly known as TicketDirect, and its parent company, Fortress Informations Systems Ltd.

An application to place the former Dunedin-based company in liquidation was made on August 14. The company had operated under the tagline: ‘We’re the good guys you have been waiting for.’

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The company’s collapse has left many ticket holders and organisations out-of-pocketincluding those involved in sports, music and entertainment.

Highlanders chief executive Roger Clark, left, and Canada-born businessman Matthew Davey.

Supplied

Highlanders chief executive Roger Clark, left, and Canada-born businessman Matthew Davey.

Repeated attempts to contact sole director Matt Davey at his listed contact addresses in New Zealand, Australia and his home country of Canada have been unsuccessful.

Both rugby franchises declined to comment about the case, or the exact amount owed, which is understood to be six figures.

Wellington lawyer Julie Crengle, acting on behalf of the Hurricanes, said: “We are not in a position to provide those details in advance of the proceedings.”

Stuff earlier reported the Hurricanes had contacted police in an attempt to recover $200,000 from the struggling ticketing company, after fans failed to secure refunds.

Dane Coles of the Hurricanes attempts to evade Braydon Ennor of the Crusaders during the round 2 Super Rugby Aotearoa match between the Hurricanes and the Crusaders on June 21, 2020 in Wellington,.

Hagen Hopkins/Getty Images

Dane Coles of the Hurricanes attempts to evade Braydon Ennor of the Crusaders during the round 2 Super Rugby Aotearoa match between the Hurricanes and the Crusaders on June 21, 2020 in Wellington,.

Davey was the largest shareholder of the Highlanders after buying into the Dunedin-based rugby franchise in 2015. The franchise has stopped using Ticket Rocket and is not owed money.

Davey sold 300 of his 462 shares in the Highlanders in May, and stepped down as a director.

The Palmerston North City Council also filed proceedings against Ticket Rocket’s holding company to freeze $676,000.

A logo from the Ticket Rocket website.

Ticket Rocket

A logo from the Ticket Rocket website.

Documents from that case, which was heard in the High Court at Dunedin in June, noted concerns over the company accessing ‘’funds held on trust to meet its cashflow requirements, or debts unrelated to the trust fund’’.

The company’s receivers, BDO Christchurch, put Ticket Rocket up for sale in October.

The receivership did not affect the sale of tickets, with the company’s websites continuing to sell tickets as normal.

Proceeds made post-receivership go directly to the relevant promoter/venue, with current promotions including Mitre 10 Cup games involving Hawke’s Bay and Waikato.

Stuff