Kawasaki to introduce ten electric and hybrid motorcycles by 2025

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Kawasaki has been toying with electric power for a while now.

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Kawasaki has been toying with electric power for a while now.

Kawasaki is preparing to unleash an onslaught of electrified two-wheelers before we get halfway through the decade, before transitioning to electric and hybrid-only power by 2035.

No fewer than ten electric and hybrid motorcycles will be introduced by 2025 as Kawasaki endeavours to be the clean, green leader in its industry.

Interestingly, those models will also include at least one hydrogen-powered machine.

During its presentation in Tokyo, one motorbike presented used a hydrogen-powered H2 engine, although it was unclear if its trademark supercharger was still included. Makes sense giving the H2 hydrogen power, doesn’t it?

Hydrogen could also be used to extend the life of Kawasaki’s combustion models. If Kawasaki can create a hydrogen-powered hybrid, it could theoretically still offer screaming superbikes without the environmental penalty of a current ZX-10R. We’ll have to wait and see on that front though.

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Other models expected are small-displacement-electric-replacements, one of which should spawn as an EV alternative to the Ninja 400. Kawasaki has been working on that one for a while now, having officially revealed the prototype a few years ago.

Big sports tourers like the H2 SX are viable options for larger hybrid or fully electric systems, as they aren’t as concerned about weight.

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Big sports tourers like the H2 SX are viable options for larger hybrid or fully electric systems, as they aren’t as concerned about weight.

Another will be a hybrid set at a similar performance position, using a 48-volt set up that can power the bike by itself when within city limits and at low speeds, while providing a performance boost at higher speeds.

It will also get some form of automatic regeneration, probably in the braking system, and an automatic transmission.

We’d expect some of the new electrified models to be tourers of some description, considering the big mile-munchers aren’t as concerned with putting on weight as sports bikes are.

One of the new hybrid systems will be GPS-controlled in cities with geofencing for EVs.

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One of the new hybrid systems will be GPS-controlled in cities with geofencing for EVs.

There’s also a chance of some off-road models fitting the bill, particularly fully electric models that prefer torque to outright power.

Aside from the electric 400, Kawasaki has indicated it wants to target the premium end of the market, which means they won’t come cheap.

Additionally, Kawasaki has confirmed it will only sell machinery in the US, Canada, Europe, Japan and Australia (which hopefully includes New Zealand) by 2035.